A baseline study of importance of bovines for human Schistosoma Japonicum infections around Poyang Lake, China: Villages studied and snail sampling strategy

Davis, G. M., Wu, W. P., Chen, H. G., Liu, H. Y., Guo, J. G., Lin, D. D., Lu, S. B., Williams, G., Sleigh, A., Feng, Z. and McManus, D. P. (2002) A baseline study of importance of bovines for human Schistosoma Japonicum infections around Poyang Lake, China: Villages studied and snail sampling strategy. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 66 4: 359-371.


Author Davis, G. M.
Wu, W. P.
Chen, H. G.
Liu, H. Y.
Guo, J. G.
Lin, D. D.
Lu, S. B.
Williams, G.
Sleigh, A.
Feng, Z.
McManus, D. P.
Title A baseline study of importance of bovines for human Schistosoma Japonicum infections around Poyang Lake, China: Villages studied and snail sampling strategy
Journal name American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9637
Publication date 2002-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 66
Issue 4
Start page 359
End page 371
Total pages 13
Editor Kazura, J. W.
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
321202 Epidemiology
730399 Health and support services not elsewhere classified
Abstract An epidemiologic survey among four administrative villages around Poyang Lake, in Jiangxi Province, China (two experimental and two controls) is being conducted to determine if bovine infections are responsible for the persistence of human schistosomiasis transmission on Yangtze River marshlands. A previously published paper presented the experimental design and baseline data for humans and bovines. This paper presents basic data for the four villages using remote sensing, and baseline data for snails that includes geographic information systems and remote sensing technology to classify the areas of bovine grazing ranges and habitats suitable for snails. A new method for sampling Oncomelania snails in China is used to determine the distribution, density, and infection rates of snails throughout the grazing ranges from season to season over a four-year period. Hypothetically, treating bovines should reduce infection rates in snails to below the critical number necessary to maintain infections in man and bovines.
Q-Index Code C1

 
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