Does interhemispheric competition mediate motion-induced blindness? A transcranial magnetic stimulation study

Funk, Agnes P. and Pettigrew, John D. (2003) Does interhemispheric competition mediate motion-induced blindness? A transcranial magnetic stimulation study. Perception, 32 11: 1325-1338. doi:10.1068/p5088


Author Funk, Agnes P.
Pettigrew, John D.
Title Does interhemispheric competition mediate motion-induced blindness? A transcranial magnetic stimulation study
Journal name Perception   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-0066
1468-4233
Publication date 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1068/p5088
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 32
Issue 11
Start page 1325
End page 1338
Total pages 14
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Abstract Motion-induced blindness (MIB) is a phenomenon, perhaps related to perceptual rivalry, where stationary targets disappear and reappear in a cyclic mode when viewed against a background (mask) of coherent, apparent 3-D motion. Since MIB has recently been shown to share similar temporal properties with binocular rivalry, we probed the appearance-disappearance cycle of MIB using unilateral, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-a manipulation that has previously been shown to influence binocular rivalry. Effects were seen for both hemispheres when the timing of TMS was determined prospectively on the basis of a given subject's appearance-disappearance cycle, so that it occurred on average around 300 ms before the time of perceptual switch. Magnetic stimulation of either hemisphere shortened the time to switch from appearance to disappearance and vice versa. However, TMS of left posterior parietal cortex more selectively shortened the disappearance time of the targets if delivered in phase with the disappearance cycle, but lengthened it if TMS was delivered in the appearance phase after the perceptual switch. Opposite effects were seen in the right hemisphere, although less marked than the left-hemisphere effects. As well as sharing temporal characteristics with binocular rivalry, MIB therefore seems to share a similar underlying mechanism of interhemispheric modulation. Interhemispheric switching may thus provide a common temporal framework for uniting the diverse, multilevel phenomena of perceptual rivalry.
Keyword Psychology
Psychology, Experimental
Posterior Parietal Cortex
Positron-emission-tomography
Prefrontal Cortex
3-dimensional Structure
Visual-attention
Saccades
Brain
Space
Fmri
Task
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 02:53:03 EST