Managing woodlands for income maximisation in western Queensland, Australia: clearing for grazing versus timber production

Venn, T., McGavin, R. and Rogers, H. (2003) Managing woodlands for income maximisation in western Queensland, Australia: clearing for grazing versus timber production. Forest Ecology And Management, 185 3: 291-306. doi:10.1016/S0378-1127(03)00225-1


Author Venn, T.
McGavin, R.
Rogers, H.
Title Managing woodlands for income maximisation in western Queensland, Australia: clearing for grazing versus timber production
Journal name Forest Ecology And Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-1127
Publication date 2003-11-18
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0378-1127(03)00225-1
Volume 185
Issue 3
Start page 291
End page 306
Total pages 16
Editor G. M. J. Mohren
R. F. Fisher
Place of publication Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
340201 Agricultural Economics
340202 Environment and Resource Economics
720205 Industry costs and structure
720204 Industry policy
720299 Microeconomic issues not elsewhere classified
Abstract Queensland, Australia, has a proud pastoral history; however, the private and social benefits of continued woodland clearing for pasture development are unlikely to be as pronounced as they had been in the past. The environmental benefits of tree retention in and regions of the State are now better appreciated and market opportunities have arisen for the unique timbers of western Queensland. A financial model is developed to facilitate a comparison of the private profitability of small-scale timber production from remnant Acacia woodlands against clearing for pasture development in the Mulga Lands and Desert Uplands bioregions of western Queensland. Four small-scale timber production scenarios, which differ in target markets and the extent of processing (value-adding), are explored within the model. Each scenario is examined for the cases where property rights to the timber are vested with the timber processor, and where royalties are payable. For both cases of resource ownership, at least one scenario generates positive returns from timber production, and exceeds the net farm income per hectare for an average grazing property in the study regions over the period 1989-1990 to 2000-2001. The net present value per hectare of selectively harvesting and processing high-value clearwood from remnant western Queensland woodlands is found to be greater than clearing for grazing. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Keyword Forestry
Farm Forestry
Acacia Woodlands
Land Clearing
Cattle Grazing
Financial Analysis
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 12:45:46 EST