Hypoalgesic and sympathoexcitatory effects of mobilization with movement for lateral epicondylalgia

Paungmali, A., O'Leary, S., Souvlis, T. and Vicenzino, B. (2003) Hypoalgesic and sympathoexcitatory effects of mobilization with movement for lateral epicondylalgia. Physical Therapy, 83 4: 374-383.

Author Paungmali, A.
O'Leary, S.
Souvlis, T.
Vicenzino, B.
Title Hypoalgesic and sympathoexcitatory effects of mobilization with movement for lateral epicondylalgia
Journal name Physical Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-9023
1538-6724
Publication date 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 83
Issue 4
Start page 374
End page 383
Total pages 10
Editor Dr. Jules Rothstein
Jan P. Reynolds
Place of publication Alexandria
Publisher American Physical Therapy Association
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730114 Skeletal system and disorders (incl. arthritis)
Formatted abstract
Background and Purpose: Mulligan has proposed the use of mobilization with movement for lateral epicondylalgia. In this study, mobilization with movement for the elbow was examined to determine whether this intervention was capable of inducing physiological effects similar to those reported for some forms of spinal manipulation.

Participants: Seven women and 17 men (mean age=48.5 years, SD=7.2) with chronic lateral epicondylalgia participated in the study.

Methods: A-measures study was conducted to evaluate placebo, control, repeated whether mobilization with movement at the elbow produced concurrent hypoalgesia and sympathoexcitation.

Results: The treatment demonstrated an initial hypoalgesic effect and concurrent sympathoexcitation. Improvements in pain resulted in increased pain-free grip force and pressure pain thresholds. Sympathoexcitation was indicated by changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and cutaneous sudomotor and vasomotor function.

Discussion and Conclusion: This study showed that a mobilization with movement treatment technique exerted a physiological effect similar to that reported for some spinal manipulations.
Keyword Orthopedics
Rehabilitation
Lateral Epicondylalgia
Manual Therapy
Mechanism
Pain
Tennis Elbow
Human Skin Nerves
Positional Fault
Physiotherapy
Reliability
Maneuvers
Pressure
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 02:37:47 EST