The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: a review of recent developments

McGrath, J. J., Feron, F. P., Burne, T. H. J., Mackay-Sim, A. and Eyles, D. W. (2003) The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: a review of recent developments. Annals of Medicine, 35 2: 86-93. doi:10.1080/07853890310010005


Author McGrath, J. J.
Feron, F. P.
Burne, T. H. J.
Mackay-Sim, A.
Eyles, D. W.
Title The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: a review of recent developments
Journal name Annals of Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0785-3890
Publication date 2003-01-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1080/07853890310010005
Volume 35
Issue 2
Start page 86
End page 93
Total pages 8
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis AB
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730211 Mental health
Abstract The neurodevelopmental hypothesis (NDH) of schizophrenia suggests that a disruption of brain development during early life underlies the later emergence of psychosis during adulthood. The aim of this review is to chart the challenges and subsequent refinements to this hypothesis, with particular reference to the static versus progressive nature of the putative neurobiological processes underlying the NDH. A non-systematic literature review was undertaken, with an emphasis on major review papers relevant to the NDH. Weaknesses in the explanatory power of the NDH have led to a new generation of more refined hypotheses in recent years. In particular, recent versions of the hypothesis have incorporated evidence from structural neuroimaging which suggests changes in brain volumes after the onset of schizophrenia. More detailed models that incorporate progressive neurobiological processes have replaced early versions of the NDH, which were based on a 'static encephalopathy. In addition, recent models have suggested that two or more 'hits' are required over the lifespan rather than only one early-life event. Animal models are providing important insights into the sequelae of disturbed early brain development. The NDH has provided great impetus to the schizophrenia research community. Recent versions of the hypothesis have encouraged more focused and testable hypotheses.
Keyword Medicine, General & Internal
Brain Growth And Development
Prenatal Exposures
Schizophrenia
Prefrontal Cortex
Hippocampal Volume
Viral-infection
Risk-factors
Brain
Etiology
Disorder
Disease
Model
Susceptibility
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: 2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 12:17:52 EST