A synthesis of dominant ecological processes in intensive shrimp ponds and adjacent coastal environments in NE Australia

Burford, M. A., Costanzo, S. D., Dennison, W. C., Jackson, C. J., Jones, A. B., McKinnon, A. D., Preston, N. P. and Trott, L. A. (2003) A synthesis of dominant ecological processes in intensive shrimp ponds and adjacent coastal environments in NE Australia. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 46 11: 1456-1469. doi:10.1016/S0025-326X(03)00282-0


Author Burford, M. A.
Costanzo, S. D.
Dennison, W. C.
Jackson, C. J.
Jones, A. B.
McKinnon, A. D.
Preston, N. P.
Trott, L. A.
Title A synthesis of dominant ecological processes in intensive shrimp ponds and adjacent coastal environments in NE Australia
Journal name Marine Pollution Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-326X
Publication date 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0025-326X(03)00282-0
Volume 46
Issue 11
Start page 1456
End page 1469
Total pages 14
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
300705 Evaluation of Management Strategies
770406 Integrated (ecosystem) assessment and management
Abstract One of the key environmental concerns about shrimp farming is the discharge of waters with high levels of nutrients and suspended solids into adjacent waterways. In this paper we synthesize the results of our multidisciplinary research linking ecological processes in intensive shrimp ponds with their downstream impacts in tidal, mangrove-lined creeks. The incorporation of process measurements and bioindicators, in addition to water quality measurements, improved our understanding of the effect of shrimp farm discharges on the ecological health of the receiving water bodies. Changes in water quality parameters were an oversimplification of the ecological effects of water discharges, and use of key measures including primary production rates, phytoplankton responses to nutrients, community shifts in zooplankton and delta(15)N ratios in marine plants have the potential to provide more integrated and robust measures. Ultimately, reduction in nutrient discharges is most likely to ensure the future sustainability of the industry. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Environmental Sciences
Marine & Freshwater Biology
Aquaculture
Impacts
Sustainability
Bioindicators
Nutrients
Ecosystem Processes
Water-quality
Mangrove Creeks
Farm Effluent
Fresh-water
Phytoplankton Biomass
North Queensland
Prey Selection
Tidal Creek
Nitrogen
Sediments
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 02:10:14 EST