A tale of two cities: Education responds to globalisation in Hong Kong and Singapore in the aftermath of the Asian economic crisi

Wing-Leong, Cheung and Sidhu, Ravinder (2003) A tale of two cities: Education responds to globalisation in Hong Kong and Singapore in the aftermath of the Asian economic crisi. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 23 1: 43-68.

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Author Wing-Leong, Cheung
Sidhu, Ravinder
Title A tale of two cities: Education responds to globalisation in Hong Kong and Singapore in the aftermath of the Asian economic crisi
Journal name Asia Pacific Journal of Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-6855
0218-8791
Publication date 2003-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/0218879030230104
Volume 23
Issue 1
Start page 43
End page 68
Total pages 26
Editor S. Gopinathan
Place of publication Singapore
Publisher National Institute of Education by Taylor and Francis
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
330106 Comparative Education
749906 Education policy
Abstract It has been suggested that although the most theorisation about globalisation has emerged from “western” contexts, the material implications of globalisation have been felt most strongly in non-western regions. With this in mind, we are undertaking a situated analysis of how two states, Singapore and Hong Kong, are interacting with the broader processes of globalisation through their educational policies. We apply Foucault's conceptual tool of governmentality to understand (i) the conduct of governing in the contemporary nation-state, and (ii) how the “right” rationalities are being inculcated by government to create “desiring subjects” who will play their part in ensuring national prosperity. We use the Asian Economic Crisis as a point of departure to show how global-local tensions are being managed by Singapore and Hong Kong. We conclude that both these global cities have adroitly managed the Asian economic crisis to steer their citizens away from pursuits of greater political freedom and towards concerns of material well being. They have done so through a selective interpretation of globalisation, by simultaneously resisting and embracing the contradictory strands of globalisation. Education has emerged as a critical space for this selective absorption of globalising trends.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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