First report of three Kudoa species from Eastern Australia: Kudoa thyrsites from Mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), Kudoa amamiensis and Kudoa minithyrsites n. sp. from sweeper (Pempheris ypsilychnus)

Whipps, CM, Adlard, RD, Bryant, MS, Lester, RJG, Findlay, V and Kent, ML (2003) First report of three Kudoa species from Eastern Australia: Kudoa thyrsites from Mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), Kudoa amamiensis and Kudoa minithyrsites n. sp. from sweeper (Pempheris ypsilychnus). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, 50 3: 215-219. doi:10.1111/j.1550-7408.2003.tb00120.x


Author Whipps, CM
Adlard, RD
Bryant, MS
Lester, RJG
Findlay, V
Kent, ML
Title First report of three Kudoa species from Eastern Australia: Kudoa thyrsites from Mahi mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), Kudoa amamiensis and Kudoa minithyrsites n. sp. from sweeper (Pempheris ypsilychnus)
Journal name Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1066-5234
Publication date 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1550-7408.2003.tb00120.x
Volume 50
Issue 3
Start page 215
End page 219
Total pages 5
Place of publication USA
Publisher Allen Press Inc
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
270504 Invertebrate Biology
770303 Control of pests and exotic species
Abstract Fish species around the world are parasitized by myxozoans of the genus Kudoa, several of which infect and cause damage of commercial importance. In particular, Kudoa thyrsites and Kudoa amamiensis infect certain cultured fish species causing damage to muscle tissue, making the fish unmarketable. Kudoa thyrsites has a broad host and geographic range infecting over 35 different fish species worldwide, while K. amamiensis has only been reported from a few species in Japanese waters. Through morphological and molecular analyses we have confirmed the presence of both of these parasites in eastern Australian waters. In addition, a novel Kudoa species was identified, having stellate spores, with one polar capsule larger than the other three. The SSU rDNA sequence of this parasite was 1.5% different from K. thyrsites and is an outlier from K. thyrsites representatives in a phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, the spores of this parasite are distinctly smaller than those of K. thyrsites, and thus it is described as Kudoa minithyrsites n. sp. Although the potential effects of K. minithyrsites n. sp. on its fish hosts are unknown, both K. thyrsites and K. amamiensis are associated with flesh quality problems in some cultured species and may be potential threats to an expanding aquaculture industry in Australia.
Keyword Microbiology
Aquaculture
Multivalvulida
Myxozoa
Phylogeny
Ssu Rdna
Merluccius-productus Ayres
Salmon Salmo-salar
Myxosporea
Gilchrist
Pacific
Flesh
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 01:56:37 EST