Unraveling the barriers to reconceptualization of the problem in chronic pain: The actual and perceived ability of patients and health professionals to understand the neurophysiology

Moseley, Lorimer (2003) Unraveling the barriers to reconceptualization of the problem in chronic pain: The actual and perceived ability of patients and health professionals to understand the neurophysiology. Journal of Pain, 4 4: 184-189. doi:10.1016/S1526-5900(03)00488-7


Author Moseley, Lorimer
Title Unraveling the barriers to reconceptualization of the problem in chronic pain: The actual and perceived ability of patients and health professionals to understand the neurophysiology
Journal name Journal of Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1526-5900
1528-8447
Publication date 2003-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S1526-5900(03)00488-7
Volume 4
Issue 4
Start page 184
End page 189
Total pages 6
Editor G. F. Gebhart
Place of publication Naperville, Ill., U.S.A.
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730301 Health education and promotion
Abstract To identify why reconceptualization of the problem is difficult in chronic pain, this study aimed to evaluate whether (1) health professionals and patients can understand currently accurate information about the neurophysiology of pain and (2) health professionals accurately estimate the ability of patients to understand the neurophysiology of pain. Knowledge tests were completed by 276 patients with chronic pain and 288 professionals either before (untrained) or after (trained) education about the neurophysiology of pain. Professionals estimated typical patient performance on the test. Untrained participants performed poorly (mean +/- standard deviation, 55% +/- 19% and 29% +/- 12% for professionals and patients, respectively), compared to their trained counterparts (78% +/- 21% and 61% +/- 19%, respectively). The estimated patient score (46% +/- 18%) was less than the actual patient score (P < .005). The results suggest that professionals and patients can understand the neurophysiology of pain but professionals underestimate patients' ability to understand. The implications are that (1) a poor knowledge of currently accurate information about pain and (2) the underestimation of patients' ability to understand currently accurate information about pain represent barriers to reconceptualization of the problem in chronic pain within the clinical and lay arenas. (C) 2003 by the American Pain Society.
Keyword Clinical Neurology
Neurosciences
Education
Neurophysiology
Treatment
Evidence-based Medicine
Low-back-pain
Intervention
Care
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 01:55:19 EST