Do expertise and the degree of perception-action coupling affect natural anticipatory performance?

Farrow, D. and Abernethy, B. (2003) Do expertise and the degree of perception-action coupling affect natural anticipatory performance?. Perception, 32 9: 1127-1139. doi:10.1068/p3323


Author Farrow, D.
Abernethy, B.
Title Do expertise and the degree of perception-action coupling affect natural anticipatory performance?
Journal name Perception   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0301-0066
1468-4233
Publication date 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1068/p3323
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 32
Issue 9
Start page 1127
End page 1139
Total pages 13
Editor R. L. Gregory
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Abstract Two experiments using a temporal occlusion paradigm (the first with expert and novice participants and the second with participants of intermediate skill) were conducted to examine the capability of tennis players to predict the direction of an opponent's service in situ. In both experiments two different response conditions, reflecting differing degrees of perception-action coupling, were employed. In a coupled condition players were required to make a movement-based response identical to that which they would use to hit a return of service in a game situation, whereas in an uncoupled condition a verbal prediction of service direction was required. Experiment 1 provided clear evidence of superior prediction accuracy under the coupled response condition when ball flight was available, plus some limited evidence to suggest that superior prediction accuracy under uncoupled response conditions might hold true if only advance (pre-contact) information was available. Experiment 2 showed the former finding to be a robust one, but was unable to reveal any support for the latter. Experiment 1 also revealed that expert superiority is more apparent for predictions made under natural (coupled) than uncoupled response-mode conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that different perceptual processes may be in operation in anticipatory tasks which depend on skill level, the type of information presented, and degree of perception-action coupling inherent in the task requirements.
Keyword Psychology
Psychology, Experimental
Volleyball
Task
Q-Index Code C1

 
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Created: Wed, 15 Aug 2007, 01:27:20 EST