Managing emerging diseases borne by fruit bats (flying foxes), with particular reference to henipaviruses and Australian bat lyssavirus

Mackenzie, J. S., Field, H. E. and Guyatt, K. J. (2003) Managing emerging diseases borne by fruit bats (flying foxes), with particular reference to henipaviruses and Australian bat lyssavirus. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 94 Supp. 1: 59S-69S. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.94.s1.7.x


Author Mackenzie, J. S.
Field, H. E.
Guyatt, K. J.
Title Managing emerging diseases borne by fruit bats (flying foxes), with particular reference to henipaviruses and Australian bat lyssavirus
Journal name Journal of Applied Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1364-5072
1365-2672
0266-8254
Publication date 2003-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.94.s1.7.x
Volume 94
Issue Supp. 1
Start page 59S
End page 69S
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, U.K
Publisher Blackwell
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
270303 Virology
300510 Virology
730212 Disease distribution and transmission
780105 Biological sciences
0605 Microbiology
1108 Medical Microbiology
Formatted abstract
Since 1994, a number of novel viruses have been described from bats in Australia and Malaysia, particularly from fruit bats belonging to the genus Pteropus (flying foxes), and it is probable that related viruses will be found in other countries across the geographical range of other members of the genus. These viruses include Hendra and Nipah viruses, members of a new genus, Henipaviruses, within the family Paramyxoviridae; Menangle and Tioman viruses, new members of the Rubulavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae; and Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLY), a member of the Lyssavirus genus in the family Rhabdoviridae. All but Tioman virus are known to be associated with human and/ or livestock diseases. The isolation, disease associations and biological properties of the viruses are described, and are used as the basis for developing management strategies for disease prevention or control. These strategies are directed largely at disease minimization through good farm management practices, reducing the potential for exposure to flying foxes, and better disease recognition and diagnosis, and for ABLY specifically, the use. of rabies vaccine for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis. Finally, an intriguing and long-term strategy is that of wildlife immunization through plant-derived vaccination.
© 2003 The Society for Applied Microbiology
Keyword Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Microbiology
Ross River Virus
Equine Morbillivirus Infection
Hendra-virus
Nipah virus
Molecular characterization
Family Paramyxoviridae
Transgenic plants
Menangle virus
Pteropus-poliocephalus
Serologic evidence
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes Paper originally presented during the session "Coping with emerging diseases" as "Managing emerging diseases borne by fruit bats, with particular reference to Hendra, Nipah and Australian bat lyssaviruses, and as hosts to vector-borne viruses".

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Science Publications
Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 19:39:04 EST