Neonatal respiratory therapy in the new millennium: Does clinical practice reflect scientific evidence?

Hudson, R. M. and Box, R. C. (2003) Neonatal respiratory therapy in the new millennium: Does clinical practice reflect scientific evidence?. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy, 49 4: 269-272. doi:10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60143-4


Author Hudson, R. M.
Box, R. C.
Title Neonatal respiratory therapy in the new millennium: Does clinical practice reflect scientific evidence?
Journal name Australian Journal of Physiotherapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9514
Publication date 2003
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60143-4
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 49
Issue 4
Start page 269
End page 272
Total pages 4
Editor Wendy Cross
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Australian Physiotherapy Association
Collection year 2003
Language eng
Subject C1
321024 Rehabilitation and Therapy - Occupational and Physical
730204 Child health
1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Abstract Respiratory therapy has historically been considered the primary role of the physiotherapist in neonatal intensive care in Australia. In 2001 a survey was undertaken of all level three neonatal intensive care units in Australia to determine the role of the physiotherapist and of respiratory therapy in clinical practice. It appears that respiratory therapy is provided infrequently, with the number of infants treated per month ranging from 0 to 10 in 15 of the 20 units who provide respiratory therapy, regardless of therapist availability. The median number of respiratory treatments per month during the week was three, and on weekends it was one. Respiratory therapy was carried out by physiotherapists and nurses in 54.6% of units, by physiotherapists only in 36.4% of units, and by nurses only in the remaining 9% of units surveyed. There was also a diminution of the role of respiratory therapy in the extubation of premature infants. A review of the literature shows that overall the use of respiratory therapy reflects current evidence. The question remains whether it is possible to maintain the competency of staff and justify the cost of training in the current healthcare economic climate. It seems probable that the future role of physiotherapists in neonatal intensive care unit may be in the facilitation of optimal neurological development of surviving very low birth weight infants.
Keyword Rehabilitation
Sport Sciences
Respiratory Therapy
Physical Therapy Techniques
Intensive Care Neonatal
Chest Physiotherapy
Postextubation Atelectasis
Infants
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
2004 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 19:15:17 EST