Effect of air temperature and energy intake on body mass, body composition and energy requirements in sheep

Degen, A.A. and Young, B. (2002) Effect of air temperature and energy intake on body mass, body composition and energy requirements in sheep. Journal of Agricultural Science, 138 2: 221-226. doi:10.1017/S0021859601001812


Author Degen, A.A.
Young, B.
Title Effect of air temperature and energy intake on body mass, body composition and energy requirements in sheep
Journal name Journal of Agricultural Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-5146
0021-8596
Publication date 2002-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0021859601001812
Volume 138
Issue 2
Start page 221
End page 226
Total pages 6
Editor R.E.L. Naylor
J. Wiseman
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
300403 Animal Nutrition
630100 Livestock
Formatted abstract
Body mass was measured and body composition and energy requirements were estimated in sheep at four air temperatures (0°C to 30°C) and at four levels of energy offered (4715 to 11785 kJ/day) at a time when the sheep reached a constant body mass. Final body mass was affected mainly by metabolizable energy intake and, to a lesser extent, by air temperature, whereas maintenance requirements were affected mainly by air temperature. Mean energy requirements were similar and lowest at 20°C and 30°C (407.5 and 410.5 kJ/kg 0.75, respectively) and increased with a decrease in air temperature (528.8 kJ/kg0.75 at 10°C and 713.3 kJ/kg0.75 at 0°C). Absolute total body water volume was related positively to metabolizable energy intake and to air temperature. Absolute fat, protein and ash contents were all affected positively by metabolizable energy intake and tended to be related positively to air temperature. In proportion to body mass, total body water volume decreased with an increase in metabolizable energy intake and with an increase in air temperature. Proportionate fat content increased with an increase in metabolizable energy intake and tended to increase with an increase in air temperature. In contrast, proportionate protein content decreased with an increase in metabolizable energy intake and tended to decrease with an increase in air temperature. In all cases, the multiple linear regression using both air temperature and metabolizable energy intake improved the fit over the simple linear regressions of either air temperature or metabolizable energy intake and lowered the standard error of the estimate. The fit was further improved and the standard error of the estimate was further lowered using a polynomial model with both independent variables to fit the data, since there was little change in the measurements between 20°C and 30°C, as both air temperatures were most likely within the thermal neutral zone of the sheep. It was concluded that total body energy content, total body water volume, fat and protein content of sheep of the same body mass differed or tended to differ when kept at different air temperatures. © 2002 Cambridge University Press.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 18:48:25 EST