Manipulation of colonic bacteria and volatile fatty acid production by dietary high amylose maize (amylomaize) starch granules

Wang, X., Brown, I. L., Khaled, D., Mahoney, M. C., Evans, A. J. and Conway, P. L. (2002) Manipulation of colonic bacteria and volatile fatty acid production by dietary high amylose maize (amylomaize) starch granules. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 93 3: 390-397. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2672.2002.01704.x


Author Wang, X.
Brown, I. L.
Khaled, D.
Mahoney, M. C.
Evans, A. J.
Conway, P. L.
Title Manipulation of colonic bacteria and volatile fatty acid production by dietary high amylose maize (amylomaize) starch granules
Journal name Journal of Applied Microbiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1364-5072
1365-2672
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1046/j.1365-2672.2002.01704.x
Volume 93
Issue 3
Start page 390
End page 397
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford
Publisher Blackwell Science
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
320401 Medical Bacteriology
730113 Digestive system and disorders
0605 Microbiology
1108 Medical Microbiology
Abstract Aims : To study the effects of amylomaize starch and modified (carboxymethylated and acetylated) amylomaize starches on the composition of colonic bacteria and the production of volatile fatty acids, in mice. Methods and Results : Balb/c mice were fed with experimental diets containing various amount of amylomaize and modified amylomaize starches. Colonic bacterial populations and short-chain fatty acids were monitored. Results showed that the increases in indigenous bifidobacteria were detected in mice fed all starches tested; however, the highest numbers were observed in the group fed with 40% unmodified amylomaize starch. The starch type influenced the populations of indigenous Lactobacillus , Bacteroides and coliforms. High Lactobacillus numbers were achieved in the colon of mice fed with high concentration of amylomaize starch. Acetylated amylomaize starch significantly reduced the population of coliforms. In addition, orally dosed amylomaize utilizing bifidobacteria reached their highest levels when fed together with amylomaize or carboxymethylated amylomaize starch and in both cases butyrate levels were markedly increased. Conclusions: These results indicate that different amylomaize starches could generate desirable variation in gut microflora and that particular starches may be used to selectively modify gut function. Significance and Impact of Study: Amylomaize starch appeared to enhance the desirable composition of colonic bacteria in mice, and suggested it possessed the potential prebiotic properties.MTherefore, resistant starch and its chemical derivatives may exert beneficial impacts to the human colon.
Keyword Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
Microbiology
Resistant Starch
Bifidobacterium-longum
Human Gut
Oligofructose
Microflora
Tract
Pigs
Rats
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 18:42:47 EST