GPs' perceived competence and comfort in managing medical emergencies in southeast Queensland

Dick, Marie-Louise, Schluter, Philip, Johnston, Catherine and Coulthard, Mark (2002) GPs' perceived competence and comfort in managing medical emergencies in southeast Queensland. Australian Family Physician, 31 9: 870-875.


Author Dick, Marie-Louise
Schluter, Philip
Johnston, Catherine
Coulthard, Mark
Title GPs' perceived competence and comfort in managing medical emergencies in southeast Queensland
Journal name Australian Family Physician   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0300-8495
Publication date 2002-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 31
Issue 9
Start page 870
End page 875
Total pages 6
Editor B. Vassiliadis
Place of publication Sydney, Australia
Publisher Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
321208 Primary Health Care
730199 Clinical health not specific to particular organs, diseases and conditions
Formatted abstract
INTRODUCTION
Little is known about general practitioners' confidence and competence in managing medical emergencies, yet these qualities are vital to maximise patients' chances of survival.

AIM
To document the distribution and determinants of GPs' self reported levels of comfort and competence in managing medical emergencies, and GPs' interest in attending an emergency skills update course.

METHOD

We conducted a random sample survey of 900 GPs in current clinical practice in southeast Queensland.

RESULTS
Five hundred and twelve (57%) GPs responded to the questionnaire. An association between perceived levels of competence and the amount of training GPs received was demonstrated (P<00.05 for 14 of 16 listed emergency skills), as was an association between level of comfort in managing emergencies and the frequency with which such emergency types are encountered in practice (P<0.05 for 8 of 18 listed emergencies). Sixty-nine percent of GPs expressed interest in attending a specifically designed emergency medicine update course.

CONCLUSION
Postgraduate training in and experience with medical emergencies is important for GPs' confidence and competence in dealing with such emergencies. A proposed update course designed specifically for GPs was strongly supported.
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 18:37:40 EST