A field study conducted at Kidston Gold Mine, to evaluate the impact of arsenic and zinc from mine tailing to grazing cattle

Bruce, S.L., Noller, B.N., Grigg, A.H., Mullen, B.F., Mulligan, D.R., Ritchie, P.J., Currey, N. and Ng, J.C. (2003). A field study conducted at Kidston Gold Mine, to evaluate the impact of arsenic and zinc from mine tailing to grazing cattle. In: , Toxicology letters: Proceedings of the 9th International Congress of Toxicology (ICT IX). 9th International Congress of Toxicology (ICT IX), South Molle Island Resort Conf Centre, Queensland, (23-34). 8-12 July, 2001.


Author Bruce, S.L.
Noller, B.N.
Grigg, A.H.
Mullen, B.F.
Mulligan, D.R.
Ritchie, P.J.
Currey, N.
Ng, J.C.
Title of paper A field study conducted at Kidston Gold Mine, to evaluate the impact of arsenic and zinc from mine tailing to grazing cattle
Conference name 9th International Congress of Toxicology (ICT IX)
Conference location South Molle Island Resort Conf Centre, Queensland
Conference dates 8-12 July, 2001
Proceedings title Toxicology letters: Proceedings of the 9th International Congress of Toxicology (ICT IX)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Toxicology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier/North-Holland
Publication Year 2003
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/S0378-4274(02)00378-8
ISSN 0378-4274
Volume 137
Issue 1-2
Start page 23
End page 34
Total pages 12
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The grazing trial at Kidston Gold Mine, North Queensland, was aimed specifically to assess the uptake of metals from the tailing and the potential for unacceptable contamination of saleable meat. Further aims included estimating metal dose rates and identifying potential exposure pathways including plant uptake of heavy metals, mine tailings adhered to plants and direct ingestion of mine tailing. It was found that of the 11 metals analysed (As, Zn, Co, Cd, Cr, Sn, Pb, Sb, Hg, Se and Ni) in the animal's liver, muscle and blood during the 8-month trial period, only accumulation of arsenic and zinc occurred. A risk assessment including these two metals was conducted to determine the potential for chronic metal toxicity and long-term contamination, using the estimates of metal dose rate. It was concluded that no toxicity or long-term contamination in cattle was likely at this site. Management procedures were therefore not required at this site; however, the results highlight percent ground cover and standing dry matter (DM) as important factors in decreasing metal exposure from direct ingestion of tailings and dust adhered to plants. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Subjects C1
321299 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
730210 Environmental health
Keyword Toxicology
Heavy Metals
Tailing
Arsenic
Zinc
Bioavailability
Cattle
Risk Assessment
Absolute Bioavailability
Lead
Q-Index Code C1

 
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