An evaluation of tobacco brief intervention training in three Indigenous health care settings in north Queensland

Harvey, D., Tsey, K., Cadet-James, Y., Minniecon, D. L., Ivers, R., McCalman, J., Lloyd, J. and Young, D. (2002) An evaluation of tobacco brief intervention training in three Indigenous health care settings in north Queensland. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 26 5: 426-431. doi:10.1111/j.1467-842X.2002.tb00342.x


Author Harvey, D.
Tsey, K.
Cadet-James, Y.
Minniecon, D. L.
Ivers, R.
McCalman, J.
Lloyd, J.
Young, D.
Title An evaluation of tobacco brief intervention training in three Indigenous health care settings in north Queensland
Journal name Australia and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2002.tb00342.x
Volume 26
Issue 5
Start page 426
End page 431
Total pages 6
Editor J. Lumley
J. Daly
Place of publication Australia
Publisher Public Health Association of Australia
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
730200 Public Health
Abstract Objective: To evaluate the pilot phase of a tobacco brief intervention program in three Indigenous health care settings in rural and remote north Queensland. Methods: A combination of in-depth interviews with health staff and managers and focus groups with health staff and consumers. Results: The tobacco brief intervention initiative resulted in changes in clinical practice among health care workers in all three sites. Although health workers had reported routinely raising the issue of smoking in a variety of settings prior to the intervention, the training provided them with an additional opportunity to become more aware of new approaches to smoking cessation. Indigenous health workers in particular reported that their own attempts to give up smoking following the training had given them confidence and empathy in offering smoking cessation advice. However, the study found no evidence that anybody had actually given up smoking at six months following the intervention. Integration of brief intervention into routine clinical practice was constrained by organisational, interpersonal and other factors in the broader socio-environmental context. Conclusions/implications: While modest health gains may be possible through brief intervention, the potential effectiveness in Indigenous settings will be limited in the absence of broader strategies aimed at tackling community-identified health priorities such as alcohol misuse, violence, employment and education. Tobacco and other forms of lifestyle brief. intervention need to be part of multi-level health strategies. Training in tobacco brief intervention should address both the Indigenous context and the needs of Indigenous health care workers.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Attitudes
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Population Health Publications
 
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