Physiological responses to the menstrual cycle - Implications for the development of heat illness in female athletes

Marsh, S. A. and Jenkins, D. G. (2002) Physiological responses to the menstrual cycle - Implications for the development of heat illness in female athletes. Sports Medicine, 32 10: 601-614. doi:10.2165/00007256-200232100-00001


Author Marsh, S. A.
Jenkins, D. G.
Title Physiological responses to the menstrual cycle - Implications for the development of heat illness in female athletes
Journal name Sports Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0112-1642
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.2165/00007256-200232100-00001
Volume 32
Issue 10
Start page 601
End page 614
Total pages 14
Editor J. N. Shanahan
Place of publication Auckland, NZ
Publisher Adis International
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
321205 Nutrition and Dietetics
730215 Nutrition
Abstract Fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone during the menstrual cycle can cause changes in body systems other than the reproductive system. For example, progesterone is involved in the regulation of fluid balance in the renal tubules and innervation of the diaphragm via the phrenic nerve. However, few significant changes in the responses of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, blood lactate, bodyweight, performance and ratings of perceived exertion are evident across the cycle. Nevertheless, substantial evidence exists to suggest that increased progesterone levels during the luteal phase cause increases in both core and skin temperatures and alter the temperature at which sweating begins during exposure to both ambient and hot environments. As heat illness is characterised by a significant increase in body temperature, it is feasible that an additional increase in core temperature during the luteal phase could place females at an increased risk of developing heat illness during this time. In addition, it is often argued that physiological gender differences such as oxygen consumption, percentage body fat and surface area-to-mass ratio place females at a higher risk of heat illness than males. This review examines various physiological responses to heat exposure during the menstrual cycle at rest and during exercise, and considers whether such changes increase the risk of heat illness in female athletes during a particular phase of the menstrual cycle.
Keyword Sport Sciences
Blood Lactate Responses
Oral-contraceptives
Exercise Performance
Thermoregulatory Responses
Core Temperature
Luteal-phase
Young-women
Ventilatory Response
Metabolic Responses
Fluid-regulation
Q-Index Code C1
Additional Notes This document is a journal review.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 17:56:41 EST