Can the nitrogenous composition of xylem sap be used to assess salinity stress in Casuarina glauca?

Cramer, V. A., Schmidt, S., Stewart, G. R. and Thorburn, P. J. (2002) Can the nitrogenous composition of xylem sap be used to assess salinity stress in Casuarina glauca?. Tree Physiology, 22 14: 1019-1026. doi:10.1093/treephys/22.14.1019


Author Cramer, V. A.
Schmidt, S.
Stewart, G. R.
Thorburn, P. J.
Title Can the nitrogenous composition of xylem sap be used to assess salinity stress in Casuarina glauca?
Journal name Tree Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0829-318X
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/treephys/22.14.1019
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 22
Issue 14
Start page 1019
End page 1026
Total pages 8
Place of publication Victoria, Canada
Publisher Heron Publishing
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
270402 Plant Physiology
620503 Forestry
770707 Rehabilitation/reafforestation
Abstract It is predicted that dryland salinity will affect up to 17 Mha of the Australian landscape by 2050, and therefore, monitoring the health of tree plantings and remnant native vegetation in saline areas is increasingly important. Casuarina glauca Sieber ex Spreng. has considerable salinity tolerance and is commonly planted in areas with a shallow, saline water table. To evaluate the potential of using the nitrogenous composition of xylem sap to assess salinity stress in C. glauca, the responses of trees grown with various soil salinities in a greenhouse were compared with those of trees growing in field plots with different water table depths and groundwater salinities. In the greenhouse, increasing soil salinity led to increased allocation of nitrogen (N) to proline and arginine in both stem and root xylem sap, with coincident decreases in citrulline and asparagine. Although the field plots were ranked as increasingly saline-based on ground water salinity and depth-only the allocation of N to citrulline differed significantly between the field plots. Within each plot, temporal variation in the composition of the xylem sap was related to rainfall, rainfall infiltration and soil salinity. Periods of low rainfall and infiltration and higher soil salinity corresponded with increased allocation of N to proline and arginine in the xylem sap. The allocation of N to citrulline and asparagine increased following rainfall events where rain was calculated to have infiltrated sufficiently to decrease soil salinity. The relationship between nitrogenous composition of the xylem sap of C. glauca and soil salinity indicates that the analysis of xylem sap is an effective method for assessing changes in salinity stress in trees at a particular site over time. However, the composition of the xylem sap proved less useful as a comparative index of salinity stress in trees growing at different sites.
Keyword Forestry
Amino Acids
Plant Physiological Responses
Rainfall
Rainfall Infiltration
Shallow Water Tables
Soil Salinity
Tree Health
Proline Accumulation
Drought Stress
Southeast Queensland
Compatible Solutes
Salt Tolerance
Water-stress
Plants
Metabolism
Acid
Groundwater
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 17:27:15 EST