Comparative influence of forest management and habitat structural factors on the abundances of hollow-nesting bird species in subtropical Australian eucalypt forest

Smyth, A, Mac Nally, R and Lamb, D (2002) Comparative influence of forest management and habitat structural factors on the abundances of hollow-nesting bird species in subtropical Australian eucalypt forest. Environmental Management, 30 4: 547-559. doi:10.1007/s00267-002-2678-7


Author Smyth, A
Mac Nally, R
Lamb, D
Title Comparative influence of forest management and habitat structural factors on the abundances of hollow-nesting bird species in subtropical Australian eucalypt forest
Journal name Environmental Management   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0364-152X
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00267-002-2678-7
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 547
End page 559
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
300802 Wildlife and Habitat Management
770703 Living resources (flora and fauna)
Abstract We examined the impact of single-tree selective logging and fuel reduction bums on the abundance of hollow-nesting bird species at a regional scale in southeastern Queensland, Australia. Data were collected on species abundance and habitat structure of dry sclerophyll production forest at 36 sites with known logging and fire histories. Sixteen bird species were recorded with most being resident, territorial, obligate hollow nesters that used hollows that were either small (<10 cm diameter) or very large (>18 cm diameter). Species densities were typically low, but combinations of two forest management and three habitat structural variables influenced the abundances of eight bird species in different and sometimes conflicting ways. The results suggest that habitat tree management for biodiversity in production forests cannot depend upon habitat structural characteristics alone. Management histories appear to have independent influence (on some bird species) that are distinguishable from their impacts on habitat structure per se. Rather than managing to maximize species abundances to maintain biodiversity, we may be better off managing to avoid extinctions of populations by identifying thresholds of acceptable fluctuations in populations of not only hollow-nesting birds but other forest dependent wildlife relative to scientifically valid forest management and habitat structural surrogates.
Keyword Environmental Sciences
Timber Harvesting
Fire Regimes
Cavity-nesting Birds
Hierarchical Partitioning
Ecologically Sustainable Forest Management
Nightjars Aegotheles Cristatus
New-south-wales
Treecreepers
Biodiversity
Conservation
Disturbance
Ecology
Trees
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 17:26:14 EST