Growth and hard tissue remodelling in the dentition of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi)

Kemp, A. (2002) Growth and hard tissue remodelling in the dentition of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi). Journal of Zoology, 257 2: 219-235. doi:10.1017/S0952836902000821


Author Kemp, A.
Title Growth and hard tissue remodelling in the dentition of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi)
Formatted title
Growth and hard tissue remodelling in the dentition of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi)
Journal name Journal of Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0952-8369
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0952836902000821
Volume 257
Issue 2
Start page 219
End page 235
Total pages 17
Place of publication New York
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2002
Language eng
Subject C1
270500 Zoology
780105 Biological sciences
Abstract The extant lungfish, including three genera, the Australian, South American and African lungfishes, retain a dentition that appeared first in the Devonian, in some of the oldest members of this group. The dentition consists of permanent tooth plates with persistent cusps that appear early in development of the fish. The cusps, separate early in development, form ridges that are arranged in a radiating pattern, and fusion of the cusps to each other and to the underlying jaw bone produces a tooth plate. The lungfish dentition is based on a template of mantle dentine that surrounds bone trabeculae enclosed in the tooth plate. The mantle layer is covered by enamel. In most derived dipnoans, this framework encloses two further forms of dentine, known as interdenteonal and circumdenteonal dentines. The tooth plates grow in area and in depth without evidence of macroscopic resorption of dentines or of enamel. Increase in size and changes in shape of lungfish tooth plates is actually achieved by a process involving microscopic remodelling of the bone contained within the margin of each tooth plate, and the later addition of new dentines and enamel within and around the bone. This is accomplished without creating weakness in the structural integrity of the tooth plate and bone complex, and proceeds in line with growth and remodelling of the jaw bones attached to the tooth plates.
Keyword Zoology
Dentition
Lungfish
Ontogeny
Histogenesis
Growth
Neoceratodus Forsteri
Tooth-plates
Chirodipterus
Morphology
Fossil
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 17:01:44 EST