The calculation of accident risks in fitness for work assessments: diseases that can cause sudden incapacity

Donoghue, A.M. (2001) The calculation of accident risks in fitness for work assessments: diseases that can cause sudden incapacity. Occupational Medicine-oxford, 51 4: 266-271. doi:10.1093/occmed/51.4.266


Author Donoghue, A.M.
Title The calculation of accident risks in fitness for work assessments: diseases that can cause sudden incapacity
Journal name Occupational Medicine-oxford   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-7480
1471-8405
Publication date 2001
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/occmed/51.4.266
Volume 51
Issue 4
Start page 266
End page 271
Total pages 6
Editor J. R. Beach
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publisher Society of Occupational Medicine by Oxford University Press
Collection year 2001
Language eng
Subject C1
321201 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
730208 Occupational health (excl. economic development aspects)
Abstract Risk equations have been developed to assist in determining fitness for work of people with diseases that may cause rapid loss of control. The four equations calculate the frequency of fatal injury to the person with the disease, the frequency of fatal injury to colleagues in the workplace, and the cost of fatal injury and property damage to the employer, it is suggested that the additional risk of fatal injury to the person with the disease should not exceed the fatal injury rate in high-risk industries such as forestry, fishing and mining. it is also suggested that the additional risk of fatal injury to each colleague should be no more than one-tenth of the fatal injury rate due to motor vehicle accidents in the community. Two hypothetical case examples are given, demonstrating the use of the equations. The equations highlight the need to examine the risks associated with individuals, their specific jobs and their workplaces. They also highlight significant uncertainties in the determination of fitness, which perhaps have been underestimated in the past. Wherever possible, redundant defences should be utilized to prevent accidents in the event of sudden incapacity.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Accident Prevention
Diabetes
Discrimination
Duty Of Care
Epilepsy
Fitness For Work
Ischaemic Heart Disease
Risk Assessment
Occupational Injuries
Medical Conditions
Drivers
Perspective
Seizures
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 16:14:01 EST