Randomized controlled trial of two cigarette quit programmes in coronary care patients after acute myocardial infarction

Feeney, GFX, McPherson, A, Connor, JP, McAlister, A, Young, RM and Garrahy, P (2001) Randomized controlled trial of two cigarette quit programmes in coronary care patients after acute myocardial infarction. Internal Medicine Journal, 31 8: 470-475. doi:10.1046/j.1445-5994.2001.00110.x


Author Feeney, GFX
McPherson, A
Connor, JP
McAlister, A
Young, RM
Garrahy, P
Title Randomized controlled trial of two cigarette quit programmes in coronary care patients after acute myocardial infarction
Journal name Internal Medicine Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1444-0903
Publication date 2001
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1046/j.1445-5994.2001.00110.x
Volume 31
Issue 8
Start page 470
End page 475
Total pages 6
Editor Edward Byrne
et al
Place of publication Carlton, Victoria
Publisher Blackwell Science Asia
Collection year 2001
Language eng
Subject C1
321021 Psychiatry
730211 Mental health
Abstract Background: Tobacco cessation after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) substantially improves outcome but how effective individual programmes are needs to be established. To date, few studies have examined this factor. Aims: To assess the outcome of two smoking cessation programmes after AMI. Methods: One hundred and ninety-eight current smokers admitted to coronary care with an AMI participated in a randomized controlled study comparing two outpatient tobacco interventions, the Stanford Heart Attack Staying Free (SF) programme and a Usual Care (UC) programme. Results: Log-rank analyses revealed that patients in the SF programme were retained longer (P < 0.001) and had higher cotinine validated abstinence rates (P < 0.001) compared with patients in the UC programme. Twelve months after intervention, 39% of the SF programme compared with 2% of the UC programme demonstrated cotinine validated tobacco cessation, representing a significant reduced relapse rate in the SF programme (chi (2), P < 0.001). Conclusions: The SF smoking cessation programme initiated in hospital can significantly reduce smoking rates at 12 months after myocardial infarction. Although superior to the UC quit programme, Australian outcomes were lower than the American programme originators' published outcomes.
Keyword Medicine, General & Internal
Acute Myocardial Infarction
Randomized Trial
Smoking Cessation
Treatment Programme
People Stop Smoking
Nicotine Dependence
Hospital Patients
Cessation
Interventions
Disease
System
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 16:05:23 EST