Ross River virus transmission, infection, and disease: a cross-disciplinary review

Harley, David, Sleigh, Adrian and Ritchie, Scott (2001) Ross River virus transmission, infection, and disease: a cross-disciplinary review. Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 14 4: 909-932. doi:10.1128/CMR.14.4.909-932.2001


Author Harley, David
Sleigh, Adrian
Ritchie, Scott
Title Ross River virus transmission, infection, and disease: a cross-disciplinary review
Journal name Clinical Microbiology Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0893-8512
Publication date 2001
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1128/CMR.14.4.909-932.2001
Volume 14
Issue 4
Start page 909
End page 932
Total pages 24
Place of publication Washington, D. C., U.S.A.
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Collection year 2001
Language eng
Subject C1
0605 Microbiology
Abstract Ross River virus (RRV) is a fascinating, important arbovirus that is endemic and enzootic in Australia and Papua New Guinea and was epidemic in the South Pacific in 1979 and 1980. Infection with RRV may cause disease in humans, typically presenting as peripheral polyarthralgia or arthritis, sometimes with fever and rash. RRV disease notificatïons in Australia average 5,000 per year. The first well-described outbreak occurred in 1928. During World War II there were more outbreaks, and the name epidemic polyarthritis was applied. During a 1956 outbreak, epidemic polyarthritis was linked serologically to a group A arbovirus (Alphavirus). The virus was subsequently isolated from Aedes vigilax mosquitoes in 1963 and then from epidemic polyarthritis patients. We review the literature on the evolutionary biology of RRV, immune response to infection, pathogenesis, serologic diagnosis, disease manifestations, the extraordinary variety of vertebrate hosts, mosquito vectors, and transmission cycles, antibody prevalence, epidemiology of asymptomatic and symptomatic human infection, infection risks, and public health impact. RRV arthritis is due to joint infection, and treatment is currently based on empirical anti-inflammatory regimens. Further research on pathogenesis may improve understanding of the natural history of this disease and lead to new treatment strategies. The burden of morbidity is considerable, and the virus could spread to other countries. To justify and design preventive programs, we need accurate data on economic costs and better understanding of transmission and behavioral and environmental risks.
Keyword Microbiology
New-south-wales
Annulirostris Skuse Diptera
Barmah Forest Virus
Aedes-vigilax Skuse
Epidemic Polyarthritis
Vector Competence
Culex-annulirostris
Southeastern Australia
Western-australia
Mosquitos Diptera
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 14:58:57 EST