Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters adult behaviour: An informative animal model of schizophrenia

Burne, T. H. J., Kesby, J., OLoan, J., McGrath, J. J., Mackay-Sim, A. and Eyles, D. W. (2006). Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters adult behaviour: An informative animal model of schizophrenia. In: T. J. Crow and S. R. Hirsch, Schizophrenia Research. XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research, Davos, Switzerland, (276-276). 4-10 February 2006. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2006.01.006


Author Burne, T. H. J.
Kesby, J.
OLoan, J.
McGrath, J. J.
Mackay-Sim, A.
Eyles, D. W.
Title of paper Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters adult behaviour: An informative animal model of schizophrenia
Conference name XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research
Conference location Davos, Switzerland
Conference dates 4-10 February 2006
Proceedings title Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Poster
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2006.01.006
ISSN 0920-9964
Editor T. J. Crow
S. R. Hirsch
Volume 81
Issue Sup. 1
Start page 276
End page 276
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Background: There is growing evidence that vitamin D is active in the brain but until recently there was a lack of evidence about its role during brain development. Guided by certain features of the epidemiology of schizophrenia, we have explored the role of vitamin D in the developing brain and behaviour using whole animal models. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a vitamin D deficient diet (DVD) or control diet 6 weeks prior to mating and housed under UVB-free lighting conditions. On the day of birth all rats were fed a control diet for the remainder of the study. We observed behaviour at two timepoints; on the day of birth to study maternal behaviour, and at 10 weeks of age to study offspring behaviour in adulthood, under baseline and drug induced conditions (MK-801, haloperidol, amphetamine). Results: Prenatal vitamin D deficiency results in subtle alterations in maternal behaviour as well as long lasting effects on the adult offspring, despite a return to normal vitamin D levels during postnatal life. These affects were specific to transient prenatal vitamin D depletion as adult vitamin D depletion, combined prenatal and chronic postnatal vitamin D depletion, or ablation of the vitamin D receptor in mice led to markedly different outcomes. Conclusions: The developmental vitamin D (DVD) model now draws strength from epidemiological evidence of schizophrenia and animal experiments. Although the DVD model does not replicate every aspect of schizophrenia, it has several attractive features: (1) the exposure is based on clues from epidemiology; (2) it reproduces the increase in lateral ventricles; (3) it reproduces well-regarded behavioural phenotypes associated with schizophrenia (e.g. MK- 801 induced hyperlocomotion); and (4) it implicates a disturbance in dopamine signaling. In summary, low prenatal levels of vitamin D can influence critical components of orderly brain development and that this has a long lasting effect on behaviour.
Subjects 1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Sciences
1109 Neurosciences
Keyword Psychiatry
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 16:00:52 EST