The association between personal trauma and psychotic-like experiences in a large community sample

Scott, J., Chant, D., Andrews, G., Martin, G. and McGrath, J. (2006). The association between personal trauma and psychotic-like experiences in a large community sample. In: Schizophrenia Research: Abstracts of the XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research. XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research, Davos, Switzerland, (67-67). 4 -10 February, 2006. doi:10.1016/j.schres.2006.01.006


Author Scott, J.
Chant, D.
Andrews, G.
Martin, G.
McGrath, J.
Title of paper The association between personal trauma and psychotic-like experiences in a large community sample
Conference name XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research
Conference location Davos, Switzerland
Conference dates 4 -10 February, 2006
Proceedings title Schizophrenia Research: Abstracts of the XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Schizophrenia Research   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Poster
DOI 10.1016/j.schres.2006.01.006
ISSN 0920-9964
Volume 81
Issue Supplement 1
Start page 67
End page 67
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background:
Community surveys have found that otherwise well individuals report psychotic-like experience (PLE). A number of clinical and small population studies have shown an association between early childhood trauma and psychotic symptoms. This study aimed to examine the association between traumatic life events and PLE in a large community based sample.

Methods:
The National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing interviewed 10,641 individuals living in private dwellings in Australia . As part of a diagnostic interview (the CIDI), respondents were asked between three and six items originally designed to screen for potential psychosis, as well as items about previous exposure to personal trauma. We examined the association between previous trauma (with or without post-traumatic stress disorder) and endorsement of the psychosis screen items.

Results:

11.7% of the Australian population endorsed at least one psychosis-screening item, while 5725 (53.8%) subjects reported they had been exposed to a traumatic event but did not meet criteria for PTSD. 379 (3.6%) subjects met DSM IV criteria for PTSD. Exposure to any traumatic event was associated with higher rates of endorsement of psychosis items. A diagnosis of PTSD further increased the likelihood of positive endorsement of a psychosis screen item. This association remained significant after adjusting for substance dependence and a previous diagnosis of schizophrenia.

Conclusions:

There are a number of explanations for the association between personal trauma and PLE. These range from trauma being a component cause for psychosis through to PLE being a proxy marker for a range of clinical disorders including PTSD. Unravelling the complex causal pathways between stress, PLE and psychosis may provide new clues to help us understand the aetiopathogenesis of a variety of psychiatric conditions.
Subjects 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
110319 Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy)
111714 Mental Health
Keyword Psychiatry
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Poster presentations

 
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Created: Tue, 14 Aug 2007, 02:00:35 EST