Treatment-related reductions in catastrophizing predict return to work in individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder

Sullivan, Michael, Adams, Heather, Ellis, Tamra, Clark, Robyn, Sully, Craig and Thibault, Pascal (2017) Treatment-related reductions in catastrophizing predict return to work in individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder. Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 22 1: . doi:10.1111/jabr.12087


Author Sullivan, Michael
Adams, Heather
Ellis, Tamra
Clark, Robyn
Sully, Craig
Thibault, Pascal
Title Treatment-related reductions in catastrophizing predict return to work in individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder
Journal name Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1751-9861
1071-2089
Publication date 2017-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jabr.12087
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 22
Issue 1
Total pages 12
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with high rates of work-disability. In other domains of research, it has been shown that catastrophic thinking also contributes to work-disability. The present study examined the relation between catastrophic thinking and work-disability in individuals with PTSD. The study sample consisted of 73 work-disabled individuals with PTSD who were referred to an occupational rehabilitation service. Participants completed measures of post-traumatic stress symptoms, depression, pain, catastrophic thinking, and occupational disability at admission and termination of the rehabilitation intervention. Return-to-work was assessed 1 month following the termination of the rehabilitation intervention. Cross-sectional analyses revealed that catastrophic thinking contributed significant unique variance to the prediction of occupational disability, even when controlling for the severity of symptoms of PTSD. Prospective analyses revealed that treatment-related reductions in catastrophic thinking predicted successful return to work, beyond the variance accounted for by reductions in the severity of symptoms of PTSD. The findings suggest that catastrophic thinking is a determinant of occupational disability in individuals with PTSD. The findings further suggest that interventions designed to reduce catastrophic thinking might promote more successful occupational re-integration in individuals recovering from post-traumatic stress symptoms.
Keyword Catastrophic thinking
Disability
Post-traumatic stress disorder
Rehabilitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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