Drivers of change and sustainability in linked social–ecological systems: an analysis in the Volta river basin of Ghana, West Africa

Kotir, Julius H. , Brown, Greg, Marshall, Nadine and Johnstone, Ron (2017) Drivers of change and sustainability in linked social–ecological systems: an analysis in the Volta river basin of Ghana, West Africa. Society and Natural Resources, . doi:10.1080/08941920.2017.1290182


Author Kotir, Julius H.
Brown, Greg
Marshall, Nadine
Johnstone, Ron
Title Drivers of change and sustainability in linked social–ecological systems: an analysis in the Volta river basin of Ghana, West Africa
Journal name Society and Natural Resources   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1521-0723
0894-1920
Publication date 2017-03-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08941920.2017.1290182
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 17
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Understanding the nature and relative importance of various drivers of change is crucial for sustainable management of natural resources and in prioritizing management efforts, allocating limited resources, and understanding cumulative effects. For this article, we employed structured an expert judgments approach to identify, characterize, and assess the relative importance of the key biophysical and socioeconomic drivers of change within the Volta River Basin, West Africa. Precipitation variability, water availability, land use change, drought events, and population growth were perceived as most important, while biodiversity loss, social conflicts, pest and disease occurrence, urbanization, and pollution were viewed as less critical. A majority of these drivers were characterized as “slow” acting processes as compared to rapidly changing drivers. Intra- and interexpert groups agreement were found to be significant and convergent, indicating the reliability of the results. The implications of these results for sustainable water resources management and agricultural production are discussed.
Keyword Africa
Agri-food system
Coupled human–environmental system
Expert judgment
Socioeconomic change
Water resources system
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Dorothy Hill Collection
 
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