Social participation among older adults not engaged in full- or part-time work is associated with more physical activity and less sedentary time

Kikuchi, Hiroyuki, Inoue, Shigeru, Fukushima, Noritoshi, Takamiya, Tomoko, Odagiri, Yuko, Ohya, Yumiko, Amagasa, Shiho, Oka, Koichiro and Owen, Neville (2017) Social participation among older adults not engaged in full- or part-time work is associated with more physical activity and less sedentary time. Geriatrics and Gerontology International, . doi:10.1111/ggi.12995


Author Kikuchi, Hiroyuki
Inoue, Shigeru
Fukushima, Noritoshi
Takamiya, Tomoko
Odagiri, Yuko
Ohya, Yumiko
Amagasa, Shiho
Oka, Koichiro
Owen, Neville
Title Social participation among older adults not engaged in full- or part-time work is associated with more physical activity and less sedentary time
Journal name Geriatrics and Gerontology International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1447-0594
1444-1586
Publication date 2017-02-23
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ggi.12995
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: Social participation provides health benefits for older adults. However, there is the need to identify whether higher social participation is associated with older adults being more physically active and less sedentary (sitting time). We examined the associations of social participation with physical activity, and sedentary time, in a population-based sample of older Japanese adults.

Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional mail survey carried out in 2010 was used to collect data on social participation, physical activity, sedentary time and sociodemographic characteristics. Data were examined from 1146 community-dwelling, unemployed older adults (mean age 70.1 years, 43% men). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for associations of social participation with physical activity and total sedentary time; and, for associations with passive and mentally-active sedentary (sitting) time.

Results: For both men and women, those with higher social participation were more physically active (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.44-3.06 among men; OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.39-2.68 among women). Total sedentary time had significant associations among men (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.42-0.90), but not among women (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.58-1.11). Social participation was associated with less passive sedentary time (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.38-0.81 for men; OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.51-0.99 for women).

Conclusions: Promoting social participation among older adults could contribute to increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time, with potential benefits for chronic disease. Further research is required to elucidate the deleterious and beneficial roles of passive and mentally-active sedentary time for older adults.
Keyword Aged
Cross-sectional studies
Motor activity
Sedentary lifestyle
Social participation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Public Health Publications
 
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