A systematic review: non-suicidal self-injury in Australia and New Zealand's Indigenous populations

Black, Emma B. and Kisely, Steve (2017) A systematic review: non-suicidal self-injury in Australia and New Zealand's Indigenous populations. Australian Psychologist, . doi:10.1111/ap.12274


Author Black, Emma B.
Kisely, Steve
Title A systematic review: non-suicidal self-injury in Australia and New Zealand's Indigenous populations
Journal name Australian Psychologist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1742-9544
0005-0067
Publication date 2017-02-24
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ap.12274
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To undertake a systematic review of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) prevalence, patterns, functions, and behavioural correlates for the Indigenous populations of Australia (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders) and New Zealand (NZ; Maori).

Method: We searched the following electronic databases: PubMed, MedLine, Scopus, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, PsycInfo, and PsycArticles, CINAHL, and the Informit Health and Indigenous Peoples collections. Studies were included for review if they were published within the last 25 years and reported on NSSI in Australia and NZ's Indigenous populations.

Results: Seven studies were included, six of which came from Australia. The prevalence of NSSI in Australia ranged from 0.9% up to 22.50%; statistics varied by the different samples, types of prevalence, and relationship to alcohol. Several studies found that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples had higher rates of NSSI than other Australians, but that this was not significantly higher. Two studies indicated that NSSI was linked to alcohol use, incarceration, and a younger age. The one NZ study was of injury and not specifically NSSI.

Conclusions: Findings are limited due to a small pool of literature. Cultural variations in NSSI presentation should be considered when working with Indigenous populations. Further research is required to help determine what cultural variations may exist.
Keyword Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Australia
Indigenous
Maori
New Zealand
Non-suicidal self-injury
Self-harm
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 14 Mar 2017, 00:24:17 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)