Evolutionary psychology and global security

Von Hippel, William (2017) Evolutionary psychology and global security. Science and Global Security, 25 1: 28-41. doi:10.1080/08929882.2017.1273668


Author Von Hippel, William
Title Evolutionary psychology and global security
Journal name Science and Global Security   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1547-7800
0892-9882
Publication date 2017-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08929882.2017.1273668
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 25
Issue 1
Start page 28
End page 41
Total pages 14
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Peace and global security are human endeavors, and thus their attainment depends as much on psychology as it does on governance and technology. In this paper I outline 3 ways our evolved psychology is an obstacle to achieving international cooperation and peace. First, humans show strong evidence of adaptations for cooperation within groups, but equally clear evidence that this cooperative nature does not extend to members of other groups. Second, humans evolved to have a relative sense of fairness, and thus will often reject even mutually beneficial agreements if they benefit others more than themselves. Third, humans evolved to be self-deceptive and hypocritical, believing in the unique righteousness and inevitable victory of their own cause, which tends to exacerbate conflict. Nevertheless, these obstacles are not insurmountable and an awareness of them can help in the development of strategies to increase the chances of lasting peace and security.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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