A network model comprising 4 segmental, interconnected ganglia, and its application to simulate multi-legged locomotion in crustaceans

Grabowska, M., Toth, T. I., Smarandache-Wellmann, C. and Daun-Gruhn, S. (2015) A network model comprising 4 segmental, interconnected ganglia, and its application to simulate multi-legged locomotion in crustaceans. Journal of Computational Neuroscience, 38 3: 601-616. doi:10.1007/s10827-015-0559-3


Author Grabowska, M.
Toth, T. I.
Smarandache-Wellmann, C.
Daun-Gruhn, S.
Title A network model comprising 4 segmental, interconnected ganglia, and its application to simulate multi-legged locomotion in crustaceans
Journal name Journal of Computational Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0929-5313
1573-6873
Publication date 2015-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10827-015-0559-3
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 38
Issue 3
Start page 601
End page 616
Total pages 16
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer New York
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Inter-segmental coordination is crucial for the locomotion of animals. Arthropods show high variability of leg numbers, from 6 in insects up to 750 legs in millipedes. Despite this fact, the anatomical and functional organization of their nervous systems show basic similarities. The main similarities are the segmental organization, and the way the function of the segmental units is coordinated. We set out to construct a model that could describe locomotion (walking) in animals with more than 6 legs, as well as in 6-legged animals (insects). To this end, we extended a network model by Daun-Gruhn and Tóth (Journal of Computational Neuroscience, doi:10.1007/s10827-010-0300-1, 2011). This model describes inter-segmental coordination of the ipsilateral legs in the stick insect during walking. Including an additional segment (local network) into the original model, we could simulate coordination patterns that occur in animals walking on eight legs (e.g., crayfish). We could improve the model by modifying its original cyclic connection topology. In all model variants, the phase relations between the afferent segmental excitatory sensory signals and the oscillatory activity of the segmental networks played a crucial role. Our results stress the importance of this sensory input on the generation of different stable coordination patterns. The simulations confirmed that using the modified connection topology, the flexibility of the model behaviour increased, meaning that changing a single phase parameter, i.e., gating properties of just one afferent sensory signal was sufficient to reproduce all coordination patterns seen in the experiments.
Keyword Central pattern generator
Inter-segmental coordination
Network model
Locomotion
Sensory feedback
Arthropods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Mar 2017, 14:02:52 EST by Martyna Grabowska on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute