The effects of Machiavellian leaders on employees' use of upward influence tactics: an examination of the moderating roles of gender and perceived leader similarity

Sibunruang, Hataya and Capezio, Alessandra (2016). The effects of Machiavellian leaders on employees' use of upward influence tactics: an examination of the moderating roles of gender and perceived leader similarity. In Eran Vigoda-Gadot and Amos Drory (Ed.), The handbook of organizational politics: looking back and to the future 2nd ed. (pp. 273-292) Cheltenham, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar. doi:10.4337/9781784713492.00019


Author Sibunruang, Hataya
Capezio, Alessandra
Title of chapter The effects of Machiavellian leaders on employees' use of upward influence tactics: an examination of the moderating roles of gender and perceived leader similarity
Title of book The handbook of organizational politics: looking back and to the future
Place of Publication Cheltenham, United Kingdom
Publisher Edward Elgar
Publication Year 2016
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.4337/9781784713492.00019
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Edition 2nd
ISBN 9781784713270
Editor Eran Vigoda-Gadot
Amos Drory
Chapter number 11
Start page 273
End page 292
Total pages 20
Total chapters 15
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Machiavellian leaders have a strong propensity to advance their personal interests, which may unknowingly precipitate their employees to behave in a similar manner through the exercise of upward influence tactics as a representative of political behaviors. Machiavellian leaders can be broadly described as displaying strategic and self-serving, misanthropic and agentic orientations. Thus employees may find it hard to work with such leaders and, subsequently, recognize the relevance of exercising social influence in order to facilitate their supervisory relationships. Accordingly this chapter examines the effects of a leader’s degree of Machiavellianism on employees’ use of upward influence tactics, and further examines how the moderating roles of the gender of the employee and their perceived leader similarity come into play. In so doing, this chapter addresses the dearth of research examining the effects of Machiavellian leaders on employees’ performance of political behaviors. More specifically, it develops a better understanding of how Machiavellians may influence employees’ choices of upward influence tactics, and identifies some relevant conditions that may impact the exercise of social influence.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
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Created: Mon, 13 Mar 2017, 10:11:00 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School