Currency and competence of occupational therapists and consumers with rapidly changing technology

Steel, Emily J., Buchanan, Ricky, Layton, Natasha and Wilson, Erin (2017) Currency and competence of occupational therapists and consumers with rapidly changing technology. Occupational Therapy International, 2017 . doi:10.1155/2017/5612843


Author Steel, Emily J.
Buchanan, Ricky
Layton, Natasha
Wilson, Erin
Title Currency and competence of occupational therapists and consumers with rapidly changing technology
Journal name Occupational Therapy International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0966-7903
1557-0703
Publication date 2017-01-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1155/2017/5612843
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2017
Total pages 6
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In the policy context of consumer choice and cost-effectiveness, have occupational therapists been left behind? This paper describes the change in context for access to assistive technology resulting in expanded possibilities for participation and inclusion. A case study of environmental control systems is used to explore the overlap of mainstream and assistive products and the funding and services to support their uptake. The analysis describes a future policy and practice context in which assistive technology includes a spectrum of products decoupled from access to independent advice and support services. A broader scope of occupational therapy practice has potential to enhance the occupational rights of people with disability and the efficiency and effectiveness of assistive technology provision.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
TC Beirne School of Law Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 07 Mar 2017, 14:47:26 EST by Carmen Buttery on behalf of T.C. Beirne School of Law