Implications for pedagogy: flipping the classroom to engage pre-service teachers

Willis, Linda-Dianne (2017). Implications for pedagogy: flipping the classroom to engage pre-service teachers. In Carl Reidsema, Lydia Kavanagh, Roger Hadgraft and Neville Smith (Ed.), The flipped classroom: practice and practices in higher education (pp. 273-287) Singapore, Singapore: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-981-10-3413-8_17


Author Willis, Linda-Dianne
Title of chapter Implications for pedagogy: flipping the classroom to engage pre-service teachers
Title of book The flipped classroom: practice and practices in higher education
Place of Publication Singapore, Singapore
Publisher Springer
Publication Year 2017
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-3413-8_17
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
ISBN 9789811034138
9811034133
Editor Carl Reidsema
Lydia Kavanagh
Roger Hadgraft
Neville Smith
Chapter number 17
Start page 273
End page 287
Total pages 15
Total chapters 18
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract/Summary As noted by authors in previous chapters of this volume, the idea of flipping the classroom is not new. But the view that flipping the classroom just means students doing work at home that they once did in classrooms is simplistic, overlooking the imperative of new technologies and how these are revolutionising conventional teaching and learning. I have been a tertiary educator in Australia for almost a decade and began flipping my classroom two years ago to better engage pre-service teachers in learning to teach English and literacy. I first heard about a flipped classroom approach through a university-wide promotion (see Chap. 1). Subsequently, I joined my university’s flipping the classroom community of practice to: learn more about what others were doing in their different settings and contexts; share experiences; gain practical ideas; discuss challenges; explore solutions; receive support; and contribute to ongoing research. In this chapter, I examine and reflect on my experiences of learning so far. In particular, I call on key concepts including community of practice, ethics of responsibility, and habitus as well as frameworks such as gateway, cornerstone, and capstone knowledge that have informed my teaching to highlight the pedagogical implications of the approach as well as the impact on student learning and achievement.
Keyword Ethics of responsibility
Community of practice
Habitus
Multiliteracies pedagogy
Pre-Service teacher
English and literacy
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

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Created: Tue, 07 Mar 2017, 08:54:23 EST by Ady Boreham on behalf of School of Education