Modeling human methamphetamine use patterns in mice: chronic and binge methamphetamine exposure, reward function and neurochemistry

Kesby, James P. , Chang, Ariel, Markou, Athina and Semenova, Svetlana (2017) Modeling human methamphetamine use patterns in mice: chronic and binge methamphetamine exposure, reward function and neurochemistry. Addiction Biology, . doi:10.1111/adb.12502


Author Kesby, James P.
Chang, Ariel
Markou, Athina
Semenova, Svetlana
Title Modeling human methamphetamine use patterns in mice: chronic and binge methamphetamine exposure, reward function and neurochemistry
Journal name Addiction Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1369-1600
1355-6215
Publication date 2017-02-21
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/adb.12502
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 13
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract Different methamphetamine use patterns in human subjects may contribute to inconsistent findings regarding the effects of methamphetamine abuse on brain and behavior. The present study investigated whether human-derived chronic and binge methamphetamine use patterns have differential effects on reward and neurochemistry in mice. Brain reward function in mice was evaluated during acute/prolonged withdrawal, and in response to methamphetamine challenge using the intracranial self-stimulation procedure. Brain dopaminergic, serotonergic and glutamatergic neurochemistry was determined with high-performance liquid chromatography. Chronic and binge regimens induced withdrawal-related decreases in reward function that were more severe during the binge regimen during cycles 1-2. Despite large differences in methamphetamine dose, both regimens induced similar reward deficits during cycles 3-4. Neither methamphetamine regimen led to persistent alterations in the sensitivity to the reward-enhancing effects of acute methamphetamine challenge. The binge regimen severely depleted striatal dopamine levels and increased brain glutamine levels. The chronic regimen had milder effects on striatal dopamine levels and altered cortical dopamine and serotonin levels. This work highlights that the magnitude of acute/prolonged withdrawal may not reflect amount or frequency of methamphetamine intake. In contrast, the array of underlying neurochemical alterations was methamphetamine regimen dependent. Thus, stratifying methamphetamine-dependent individuals based on use pattern may help to cater therapeutic interventions more appropriately by targeting use pattern-specific neurotransmitter systems.
Keyword Anhedonia
Cognition
Dopamine
Glutamate
Serotonin
Withdrawal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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