Investigating the relationship between environmental factors and respiratory health outcomes in school children using the forced oscillation technique

Boeyen, Jonathon, Callan, Anna C., Blake, David, Wheeler, Amanda J., Franklin, Peter, Hall, Graham L., Shackleton, Claire, Sly, Peter D. and Hinwood, Andrea (2017) Investigating the relationship between environmental factors and respiratory health outcomes in school children using the forced oscillation technique. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, . doi:10.1016/j.ijheh.2017.01.014


Author Boeyen, Jonathon
Callan, Anna C.
Blake, David
Wheeler, Amanda J.
Franklin, Peter
Hall, Graham L.
Shackleton, Claire
Sly, Peter D.
Hinwood, Andrea
Title Investigating the relationship between environmental factors and respiratory health outcomes in school children using the forced oscillation technique
Journal name International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1618-131X
1438-4639
Publication date 2017-02-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijheh.2017.01.014
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 9
Place of publication Muenchen, Germany
Publisher Elsevier GmbH - Urban und Fischer
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Abstract The environmental factors which may affect children's respiratory health are complex, and the influence and significance of factors such as traffic, industry and presence of vegetation is still being determined. We undertook a cross-sectional study of 360 school children aged 5-12 years who lived on the outskirts of a heavy industrial area in Western Australia to investigate the effect of a range of environmental factors on respiratory health using the forced oscillation technique (FOT), a non-invasive method that allows for the assessment of the resistive and reactive properties of the respiratory system. Based on home address, proximity calculations were used to estimate children's exposure to air pollution from traffic and industry and to characterise surrounding green space. Indoor factors were determined using a housing questionnaire. Of the outdoor measures, the length of major roads within a 50m buffer was associated with increased airway resistance (Rrs8). There were no associations between distance to industry and FOT measures. For the indoor environment the presence of wood heating and gas heating in the first year of life was associated with better lung function. The significance of both indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution and effect modifiers such as green space and heating require further investigation.
Keyword Children
FOT
Green space
Industry
Respiratory health
Traffic
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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