Identification and outcomes of clinical phenotypes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: Australian National Motor Neuron Disease observational cohort

Talman, Paul, Thi Duong, Vucic, Steve, Mathers, Susan, Venkatesh, Svetha, Henderson, Robert, Rowe, Dominic, Schultz, David, Edis, Robert, Needham, Merrilee, Macdonnell, Richard, McCombe, Pamela, Birks, Carol and Kiernan, Matthew (2016) Identification and outcomes of clinical phenotypes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: Australian National Motor Neuron Disease observational cohort. BMJ Open, 6 9: . doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012054


Author Talman, Paul
Thi Duong
Vucic, Steve
Mathers, Susan
Venkatesh, Svetha
Henderson, Robert
Rowe, Dominic
Schultz, David
Edis, Robert
Needham, Merrilee
Macdonnell, Richard
McCombe, Pamela
Birks, Carol
Kiernan, Matthew
Title Identification and outcomes of clinical phenotypes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: Australian National Motor Neuron Disease observational cohort
Journal name BMJ Open   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2044-6055
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012054
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 9
Total pages 7
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Group
Collection year 2018
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective To capture the clinical patterns, timing of key milestones and survival of patients presenting with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND) within Australia.

Methods Data were prospectively collected and were timed to normal clinical assessments. An initial registration clinical report form (CRF) and subsequent ongoing assessment CRFs were submitted with a completion CRF at the time of death.

Design Prospective observational cohort study.

Participants 1834 patients with a diagnosis of ALS/MND were registered and followed in ALS/MND clinics between 2005 and 2015.

Results 5 major clinical phenotypes were determined and included ALS bulbar onset, ALS cervical onset and ALS lumbar onset, flail arm and leg and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Of the 1834 registered patients, 1677 (90%) could be allocated a clinical phenotype. ALS bulbar onset had a significantly lower length of survival when compared with all other clinical phenotypes (p<0.004). There were delays in the median time to diagnosis of up to 12 months for the ALS phenotypes, 18 months for the flail limb phenotypes and 19 months for PLS. Riluzole treatment was started in 78–85% of cases. The median delays in initiating riluzole therapy, from symptom onset, varied from 10 to 12 months in the ALS phenotypes and 15–18 months in the flail limb phenotypes. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was implemented in 8–36% of ALS phenotypes and 2–9% of the flail phenotypes. Non-invasive ventilation was started in 16–22% of ALS phenotypes and 21–29% of flail phenotypes.

Conclusions The establishment of a cohort registry for ALS/MND is able to determine clinical phenotypes, survival and monitor time to key milestones in disease progression. It is intended to expand the cohort to a more population-based registry using opt-out methodology and facilitate data linkage to other national registries.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
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