Boron- and phosphate-rich rocks in the Larsemann Hills, Prydz Bay, East Antarctica: tectonic implications

Grew, Edward S., Carson, Christopher J., Christy, Andrew G. and Boger, Steven D. (2013) Boron- and phosphate-rich rocks in the Larsemann Hills, Prydz Bay, East Antarctica: tectonic implications. Geological Society Special Publication, 383 1: 73-94. doi:10.1144/SP383.8


Author Grew, Edward S.
Carson, Christopher J.
Christy, Andrew G.
Boger, Steven D.
Title Boron- and phosphate-rich rocks in the Larsemann Hills, Prydz Bay, East Antarctica: tectonic implications
Journal name Geological Society Special Publication   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-8719
2041-4927
Publication date 2013-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1144/SP383.8
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 383
Issue 1
Start page 73
End page 94
Total pages 22
Place of publication Bath, Avon, United Kingdom
Publisher Geological Society Publishing House
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Granulite-facies paragneisses enriched in boron and phosphorus are exposed over c. 15 × 5 km2 in the Larsemann Hills, Antarctica. The most widespread are biotite gneisses containing centimetre-sized prismatine crystals, but tourmaline metaquartzite and borosilicate gneisses are richest in B (676-19 700mg/g or 0.22-6.34 wt%; B2O3). Chondrite-normalized rare-earth element (REE) patterns give two groups: (1) LaN. 150, Eu*/Eu, 0.4, which comprises most apatite-bearing metaquartzite and metapelite, tourmaline metaquartzite, and Fe-rich rocks (up to 2.3 wt%; P2O5); (2) LaN, 150, Eu*/Eu. 0.4, which comprises most borosilicate and sodic leucogneisses (2.5-7.4wt%; Na2O). Enrichment in boron and phosphorus is attributed to premetamorphic hydrothermal alteration, either in a rifted, most likely marine basin or in a mud volcanic system located inboard of a c. 1000 Ma continental arc that was active along the leading edge of the Indo-Antarctic craton. This margin developed before collision with the Australo-Antarctic craton (c. 530 Ma) merged these rocks into Gondwana and sutured them into their present position in Antarctica. Rocks lithologically similar to those in the Larsemann Hills include prismatine-bearing granulites in the Windmill Islands, Wilkes Land, and tourmaline- quartz rocks, sodic gneisses and apatitic iron formation in the Willyama Supergroup, Broken Hill, Australia.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Earth Sciences Publications
 
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