Brisbane church architecture of the 1960s: Creating modern, climatic and regional responses to liturgical change

Daunt, Lisa Marie (2016) Brisbane church architecture of the 1960s: Creating modern, climatic and regional responses to liturgical change. Queensland Review, 23 2: 224-245. doi:10.1017/qre.2016.31

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Author Daunt, Lisa Marie
Title Brisbane church architecture of the 1960s: Creating modern, climatic and regional responses to liturgical change
Journal name Queensland Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2049-7792
1321-8166
Publication date 2016-12-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1017/qre.2016.31
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 23
Issue 2
Start page 224
End page 245
Total pages 22
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2017
Formatted abstract
The twentieth century was a time of massive upheaval in the intellectual, theological and architectural spheres of society. Two world wars, massive post-war population growth and a building boom coincided with the Second Vatican Council and the liturgical movement within the Christian churches, and encountered the modern movement in architecture. This prompted a demand for a re-evaluation of church building design. In Brisbane, new approaches to church building design emerged in the 1960s, with widely divergent results. The architects, denominations and church parishes within the city — although all sought to address liturgical change and emphasise the active participation of the congregation in the services — held different opinions on how the quintessential church characteristics, immanence and transcendence, could be adapted to modern times. Analysing three exemplary Christian churches in Brisbane, this article demonstrates how in each of these designs their architects sought to evoke immanence and transcendence in a decisively new and modern manner, seeking inspiration from progressive ideas in Europe, Britain and America while striving to create buildings suited to the climate of South-East Queensland. Liturgical change, modern architecture and regional climate considerations provided compounding opportunities to rethink church design from first principles.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: ATCH (Architecture Theory History Criticism) Publications
HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Architecture Publications
 
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