Knowledge of oral cancer risk factors amongst high-risk Australians: findings from the LESIONS programme

Dost, F., Do, L. and Farah, C. S. (2016) Knowledge of oral cancer risk factors amongst high-risk Australians: findings from the LESIONS programme. Australian Dental Journal, 61 4: 432-439. doi:10.1111/adj.12408

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Author Dost, F.
Do, L.
Farah, C. S.
Title Knowledge of oral cancer risk factors amongst high-risk Australians: findings from the LESIONS programme
Journal name Australian Dental Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1834-7819
0045-0421
Publication date 2016-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/adj.12408
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 61
Issue 4
Start page 432
End page 439
Total pages 8
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Patient awareness of risk factors associated with cancer has been shown to increase patient presentation for screening and early detection. This study aimed to identify the level of awareness of oral cancer risk factors in a high risk Australian population.

Methods: Participants were recruited from the LESIONS programme between April 2012 and April 2014. Demographics were collected via semi-structured interview. A self-administered questionnaire was provided, listing a number of possible oral cancer risk factors. Participants were requested to indicate their level of agreement on a three-point scale. Bivariate and multivariable analysis was performed.

Results: A total of 1498 participants took part in the LESIONS programme and were invited to complete the questionnaire. The most common risk factors thought to be associated with oral cancer were smoking (87.5%), poor oral hygiene (67.9%) and family history (61.1%). Only 50.2% of respondents were aware of alcohol consumption as a risk factor.

Conclusions: While most participants were aware of the association between smoking and oral cancer, only half were aware of the significant risk alcohol consumption poses. A significant portion of participants also held a number of inaccurate beliefs in relation to oral cancer risk. These findings can benefit both clinicians and public health policy makers in targeting oral cancer education.
Keyword Australia
Awareness
High risk
Knowledge
Oral cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
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