Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection: a classification that should not falsely reassure the clinician

McCarthy, K. L. and Paterson, D. L. (2016) Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection: a classification that should not falsely reassure the clinician. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 1-9. doi:10.1007/s10096-016-2852-0


Author McCarthy, K. L.
Paterson, D. L.
Title Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection: a classification that should not falsely reassure the clinician
Formatted title
Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection: a classification that should not falsely reassure the clinician
Journal name European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1435-4373
0934-9723
Publication date 2016-12-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10096-016-2852-0
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection (BSI) is predominantly acquired in the hospital setting. Community-onset infection is less common. Differences in epidemiology, clinical features, microbiological factors and BSI outcomes led to the separation of bacterial community-onset BSI into the categories of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and community-acquired infection (CAI). Community-acquired P. aeruginosa BSI epidemiology is not well defined in the literature. In addition, it is also not clear if the same factors separate CAI and HCAI BSI caused by P. aeruginosa alone. A retrospective multicentre cohort study was performed looking at P. aeruginosa BSI from January 2008 to January 2011. Strict definitions for HCAI and CAI were applied. Extensive epidemiological, clinical and outcome data were obtained. Thirty-four CAI episodes and 156 HCAI episodes were analysed. The CAI group could be characterised into seven distinct categories based on comorbidities and clinically suspected source of infection. A pre-morbidly healthy group could not be identified. On multivariate analysis, the presence of a rheumatological or a gastrointestinal comorbidity were significantly associated with CAI. There was no significant difference in length of stay or rates of mortality between HCAI or CAI. The clinician should not be falsely reassured regarding outcome by the diagnosis of a community-acquired P. aeruginosa BSI.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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