A qualitative systematic review of maternal infant feeding practices in transitioning from milk feeds to family foods

Harrison, Michelle, Brodribb, Wendy and Hepworth, Julie (2016) A qualitative systematic review of maternal infant feeding practices in transitioning from milk feeds to family foods. Maternal and Child Nutrition, . doi:10.1111/mcn.12360


Author Harrison, Michelle
Brodribb, Wendy
Hepworth, Julie
Title A qualitative systematic review of maternal infant feeding practices in transitioning from milk feeds to family foods
Journal name Maternal and Child Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1740-8695
1740-8709
Publication date 2016-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/mcn.12360
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Total pages 12
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2017
Abstract Evidence supports the establishment of healthy feeding practices early in life to promote lifelong healthy eating patterns protective against chronic disease such as obesity. Current early childhood obesity prevention interventions are built on extant understandings of how feeding practices relate to infant's cues of hunger and satiety. Further insights regarding factors that influence feeding behaviors in early life may improve program designs and outcomes. Four electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed qualitative studies published between 2000 to 2014 with transitional infant feeding practice rationale from developed countries. Reporting transparency and potential bias was assessed using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research quality checklist. Thematic synthesis of 23 manuscripts identified three themes (and six sub-themes): Theme 1. Infant (physical cues and behavioural cues) focuses on the perceived signs of readiness to start solids and the feeding to influence growth and “health happiness.” Theme 2. Mother (coping strategies and knowledge and skills) focuses on the early survival of the infant and the family and the feeding to satisfy hunger and influence infant contentment, and sleep. Theme 3. Community (pressure and inconsistent advice) highlights the importance of generational feeding and how conflicting feeding advice led many mothers to adopt valued familial or culturally established practices. Overall, mothers were pivotal to feeding decisions. Satisfying infant's needs to reach “good mothering” status as measured by societal expectations was highly valued but lacked consideration of nutrition, obesity, and long term health. Maternal interpretation of healthy infant feeding and successful parenting need attention when developing strategies to support new families.
Keyword Infant feeding
Mother
Obesity
Qualitative
Sytematic review
Transitional feeding decisions
Transitional feeding
Maternal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Discipline of General Practice Publications
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Admin Only - School of Medicine
Admin only - CHRC
School of Medicine Publications
Child Health Research Centre Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 23 Nov 2016, 23:45:31 EST by Michelle Harrison on behalf of School of Medicine