Millennial and orbital variations of El Nino/Southern Oscillation and high-latitude climate in the last glacial period

Turney, C. S. M., Kershaw, A. P., Clemens, S. C., Branch, N., Moss, P. T. and Fifield, L. K. (2004) Millennial and orbital variations of El Nino/Southern Oscillation and high-latitude climate in the last glacial period. Nature, 428 6980: 306-310. doi:10.1038/nature02386


Author Turney, C. S. M.
Kershaw, A. P.
Clemens, S. C.
Branch, N.
Moss, P. T.
Fifield, L. K.
Title Millennial and orbital variations of El Nino/Southern Oscillation and high-latitude climate in the last glacial period
Journal name Nature   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0028-0836
Publication date 2004
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/nature02386
Volume 428
Issue 6980
Start page 306
End page 310
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Subject 0599 Other Environmental Sciences
0405 Oceanography
Abstract The El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon is believed to have operated continuously over the last glacial interglacial cycle(1). ENSO variability has been suggested to be linked to millennial-scale oscillations in North Atlantic climate during that time(2,3), but the proposals disagree on whether increased frequency of El Nino events, the warm phase of ENSO, was linked to North Atlantic warm or cold periods. Here we present a high-resolution record of surface moisture, based on the degree of peat humification and the ratio of sedges to grass, from northern Queensland, Australia, covering the past 45,000 yr. We observe millennial-scale dry periods, indicating periods of frequent El Nino events ( summer precipitation declines in El Nino years in northeastern Australia). We find that these dry periods are correlated to the Dansgaard - Oeschger events - millennial-scale warm events in the North Atlantic climate record - although no direct atmospheric connection from the North Atlantic to our site can be invoked. Additionally, we find climatic cycles at a semiprecessional timescale (, 11,900 yr). We suggest that climate variations in the tropical Pacific Ocean on millennial as well as orbital timescales, which determined precipitation in northeastern Australia, also exerted an influence on North Atlantic climate through atmospheric and oceanic teleconnections.
Keyword Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Southern-oscillation
Field Intensity
Australia
Variability
Monsoon
Record
Enso
Queensland
Patterns
Ocean
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
School of Architecture Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 14:11:43 EST