Chronic rhinosinusitis: a microbiome in dysbiosis and the search for alternative treatment options

Bordin, Amanda, Sidjabat, Hanna E., Cottrell, Kyra and Cervin, Anders (2016) Chronic rhinosinusitis: a microbiome in dysbiosis and the search for alternative treatment options. Microbiology Australia, 37 3: 149-152. doi:10.1071/MA16051


Author Bordin, Amanda
Sidjabat, Hanna E.
Cottrell, Kyra
Cervin, Anders
Title Chronic rhinosinusitis: a microbiome in dysbiosis and the search for alternative treatment options
Journal name Microbiology Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1324-4272
2201-9189
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/MA16051
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 3
Start page 149
End page 152
Total pages 4
Place of publication Clayton, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common chronic disease. While CRS is a multifactorial disease, many cases involve an imbalance in the sinus bacterial microbiome. This article reviews the composition of the healthy human sinus microbiome compared to the microbiome of CRS patients. Issues with current treatment options, particularly antibiotics, are discussed. Insights into the future of CRS treatment are also explored, principally with regards to probiotics.

Rhinosinusitis is a condition characterised by paranasal sinus and nasal inflammation. Symptoms include nasal blockage/obstruction/congestion, facial pain/pressure, reduction or loss of smell, and rhinorrhoea; when these continue for over 12 weeks, the condition is classified as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)1. CRS is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases worldwide, conservatively affecting 5–6% of US adults2 and 8.5% of Australian adults3. The economic burden of CRS in the US alone is approximately US$22 billion annually4.

Like many chronic diseases, CRS has a complex etiology, with interplay between microorganisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses), environmental disturbances (e.g. pollutants or smoking) and host factors (e.g. the immune system and underlying diseases)5. This article explores the role that bacteria play in CRS by examining recent research suggesting that disturbances to the sinus microbiome are involved in CRS pathophysiology.
Keyword Staphylococcus-Aureus
Diversity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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