An exploratory investigation of the daily talk time of people with non-fluent aphasia and non-aphasic peers

Brandenburg, Caitlin, Worrall, Linda, Copland, David and Rodriguez, Amy (2016) An exploratory investigation of the daily talk time of people with non-fluent aphasia and non-aphasic peers. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 1-12. doi:10.1080/17549507.2016.1209558


Author Brandenburg, Caitlin
Worrall, Linda
Copland, David
Rodriguez, Amy
Title An exploratory investigation of the daily talk time of people with non-fluent aphasia and non-aphasic peers
Journal name International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1754-9507
1754-9515
Publication date 2016-07-28
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/17549507.2016.1209558
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: This paper presents an exploratory investigation of the talk time of people with non-fluent aphasia, as measured by the CommFit™ app. Aims were to compare the talk time of people with aphasia with non-aphasic peers and measures of impairment, activity and participation. The variability of talk time over weeks and days of the week was also investigated.

Method: Twelve people with post-stroke, non-fluent aphasia and seven non-aphasic controls measured their talk time using the CommFit™ app for 6 h/day for 14 days.

Result: People with aphasia talked for a mean of 4.5 min/h and non-aphasic controls 7.2 min/h, which was not a significant difference (p = 0.056). Talk time of people with aphasia was not significantly correlated with WAB-R AQ or CADL-2 scores, but a moderate-high positive relationship between talk time and SIPSO scores was found (r = 0.648, p = 0.015). Talk time was not significantly different between the first and second weeks of recording for either group, and days of the week were not significantly different except for Saturdays, in which talk time was higher.

Conclusion: This study provides some preliminary data on talk time in people with aphasia, suggesting that talk time is an indicator of participation.
Keyword Aphasia
Assessment
Disability and health
International classification of functioning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 28 July 2016

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Oct 2016, 12:08:34 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)