Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS: an international study

Dowd, Anne-Maree, Itaoka, Kenshi, Ashworth, Peta, Saito, Aya and de Best-Waldhober, Marjolein (2014) Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS: an international study. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 28 79-87. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.06.009


Author Dowd, Anne-Maree
Itaoka, Kenshi
Ashworth, Peta
Saito, Aya
de Best-Waldhober, Marjolein
Title Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS: an international study
Formatted title
Investigating the link between knowledge and perception of CO2 and CCS: an international study
Journal name International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1750-5836
1878-0148
Publication date 2014-09
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.06.009
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 28
Start page 79
End page 87
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Discussions, opinions and decisions regarding options for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions are often underpinned by an assumption that people know what carbon dioxide (CO2) is and how it behaves. Nevertheless, there has been little empirical evidence to suggest this is actually the case. Renewable energy technologies as well as technologies such as CO2 capture and storage (CCS) present potential solutions for mitigating the anthropogenic emissions of CO2. In discussions and information provided on climate change and mitigation technologies, CO2 is referred to regularly, particularly in regards to CCS, as CO2 is the fundamental underpinnings of the technology. Yet surprisingly little research has investigated levels of knowledge and understanding of CO2 and how this affects perceptions and understanding of energy technologies, especially CCS. With a sample of 2470 participants from three countries (Australia, the Netherlands and Japan), our research found respondents had a general understanding of CO2 but poor knowledge of its scientific dimensions. These misperceptions were directly related to misperceptions of CCS, yet indirectly related to their opinion on the implementation of the technology. It was found that providing information on the scientific characteristics of CO2 reduced misunderstanding of CCS and mitigated some change in opinion formation on CCS implementation. Overall, our research demonstrated that assumed knowledge of CO2 in the general public is partially flawed and has the potential to impact future dialogue and uptake of mitigation options.
Keyword Carbon dioxide
CCS
Communication
Perceptions
Understanding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Social Science Publications
 
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