Adapting and applying evidence gathering techniques for planning and investment in street trees: a case study from Brisbane, Australia

Plant, Lyndal and Sipe, Neil (2016) Adapting and applying evidence gathering techniques for planning and investment in street trees: a case study from Brisbane, Australia. Urban Forestry and Urban Greening, 19 79-87. doi:10.1016/j.ufug.2016.07.005


Author Plant, Lyndal
Sipe, Neil
Title Adapting and applying evidence gathering techniques for planning and investment in street trees: a case study from Brisbane, Australia
Journal name Urban Forestry and Urban Greening   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1610-8167
1618-8667
Publication date 2016-09-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ufug.2016.07.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 19
Start page 79
End page 87
Total pages 9
Place of publication Muenchen, Germany
Publisher Elsevier GmbH - Urban und Fischer
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract Trees along footpath zones (or verges) grow on the “front-line” of urban forest ecosystems, increasingly recognised as essential to the quality of human life in cities. Growing so close to where residents live, work and travel, these street trees require careful planning and active management in order to balance their benefits against risks, liabilities, impacts and costs. Securing support and investment for urban trees is tough and robust business cases begin with accurate information about the resource. Few studies have accounted for spatial heterogeneity within a single land-use type in analyses of structure and composition of street tree populations. Remotely sensed footpath tree canopy cover data was used as a basis for stratification of random sampling across residential suburbs in the study area of Brisbane, Australia. Analysis of field survey data collected in 2010 from 80 representative sample sites in 52 suburbs revealed street tree population (432,445 ± 26,293) and stocking level (78%) estimates with low (6.08%) sampling error. Results also suggest that this population was transitioning to low risk, small-medium sized species with unproven longevity that could limit the capacity of the Brisbane's Neighbourhood Shadeways planting program to expand from 35% footpath tree canopy cover in 2010, to a target of a 50% by 2031. This study advances the use of contemporary techniques for sampling extensive, unevenly distributed urban tree populations and the value of accurate resource knowledge to inform evidence-based planning and investment for urban forests.
Keyword Pre-stratified sampling
Street trees
Urban forest structure and planning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
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