On the relationship between response selection and response inhibition: an individual differences approach

Bender, Angela D., Filmer, Hannah L., Garner, K. G., Naughtin, Claire K. and Dux, Paul E. (2016) On the relationship between response selection and response inhibition: an individual differences approach. Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics, 1-13. doi:10.3758/s13414-016-1158-8


Author Bender, Angela D.
Filmer, Hannah L.
Garner, K. G.
Naughtin, Claire K.
Dux, Paul E.
Title On the relationship between response selection and response inhibition: an individual differences approach
Journal name Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1943-393X
1943-3921
Publication date 2016-07-05
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3758/s13414-016-1158-8
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Abstract The abilities to select appropriate responses and suppress unwanted actions are key executive functions that enable flexible and goal-directed behavior. However, to date it has been unclear whether these two cognitive operations tap a common action control resource or reflect two distinct processes. In the present study, we used an individual differences approach to examine the underlying relationships across seven paradigms that varied in their response selection and response inhibition requirements: stop-signal, go–no-go, Stroop, flanker, single-response selection, psychological refractory period, and attentional blink tasks. A confirmatory factor analysis suggested that response inhibition and response selection are separable, with stop-signal and go–no-go task performance being related to response inhibition, and performance in the psychological refractory period, Stroop, single-response selection, and attentional blink tasks being related to response selection. These findings provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that response selection and response inhibition reflect two distinct cognitive operations.
Keyword Executive control
Individual differences
Response inhibition
Response selection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
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