Perceived discrimination predicts increased support for political rights and life satisfaction mediated by ethnic identity: a longitudinal analysis

Stronge, Samantha, Sengupta, Nikhil K., Barlow, Fiona Kate, Osborne, Danny, Houkamau, Carla A. and Sibley, Chris G. (2016) Perceived discrimination predicts increased support for political rights and life satisfaction mediated by ethnic identity: a longitudinal analysis. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 22 3: 359-368. doi:10.1037/cdp0000074


Author Stronge, Samantha
Sengupta, Nikhil K.
Barlow, Fiona Kate
Osborne, Danny
Houkamau, Carla A.
Sibley, Chris G.
Title Perceived discrimination predicts increased support for political rights and life satisfaction mediated by ethnic identity: a longitudinal analysis
Journal name Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1939-0106
1099-9809
Publication date 2016-07-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/cdp0000074
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 22
Issue 3
Start page 359
End page 368
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2017
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: The aim of the current research is to test predictions derived from the rejection-identification model and research on collective action using cross-sectional (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) methods. Specifically, an integration of these 2 literatures suggest that recognition of discrimination can have simultaneous positive relationships with well-being and engagement in collective action via the formation of a strong ingroup identity.

Method: We test these predictions in 2 studies using data from a large national probability sample of Māori (the indigenous peoples of New Zealand), collected as part of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (Ns for Study 1 and 2 were 1,981 and 1,373, respectively).

Results: Consistent with the extant research, Study 1 showed that perceived discrimination was directly linked with decreased life satisfaction, but indirectly linked with increased life satisfaction through higher levels of ethnic identification. Perceived discrimination was also directly linked with increased support for Māori rights and indirectly linked with increased support for Māori rights through higher levels of ethnic identification. Study 2 replicated these findings using longitudinal data and identified multiple bidirectional paths between perceived discrimination, ethnic identity, well-being, and support for collective action.

Conclusion: These findings replicate and extend the rejection-identification model in a novel cultural context by demonstrating via cross-sectional (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) analyses that the recognition of discrimination can both motivate support for political rights and increase well-being by strengthening ingroup identity.
Keyword Discrimination
Ethnic identity
Life satisfaction
Political rights
Rejection-identification model
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: HERDC Pre-Audit
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 07 Aug 2016, 00:33:22 EST by System User on behalf of Learning and Research Services (UQ Library)